Tag Archives | graph

No Excuses for Ugly Excel Charts

2/2/2012: Corrected the revised bar chart by setting the horizontal axis minimum to zero. Thanks to Jon Peltier for catch.

Excel remains the de-facto graphing tool at National Priorities Project. A simple chart is often the best way to convey information about federal spending and budgeting, and Excel is the common language among our researchers and IT team.

Using Excel, however, is no excuse for ignoring style and the best practices of information display. So many organizations put out amazing, well-researched publications and then tack on default Excel graphs as an afterthought. But graphs are often what people look at first, and they deserve to be first-class citizens in the editing process.

I created some Excel chart templates for NPP, drawing on two sources for inspiration and practical advice: the classic Visual Display of Quantitative Information by Edward Tufte and The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics by Dona Wong.

Tufte is big on eliminating “unnecessary ink” that distracts from the information, and Wong advocates requiring the least amount of work on the reader’s part. With their advice in mind, I modified Excel’s default bar chart from this:

Excel bar chart - default

Bar chart: Excel default

To this:

Excel bar chart - modified

Bar chart: new template

  • Smaller gap between bars
  • Don’t make readers guess the numbers; if possible, label the bars directly
  • Direct labeling means you don’t need the noisy gridlines or even the x-axis
  • Remove the y-axis tick marks for even more noise reduction
  • Get rid of those zeros by showing data in millions or billions
  • Make sure the entire length of the bars is shown (in this case, by setting the horizontal axis minimum to zero). HT Jon Peltier.

The pie chart got a similar treatment. The Excel default:

Excel pie chart - default

Pie chart: Excel default

The new template:

Excel pie chart - modified

Pie chart: new template

  • Label the pie slices directly—don’t make people use a legend to decode
  • Avoid the default Office color palette and develop your own (ours is based on colors from our website)
  • A white line between pie slices emphasizes the boundaries

Excel isn’t perfect, but it’s out there in the world, and you can’t ignore it. Luckily, a little extra effort goes a long way.

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